the rhodesian mining in the colonial era

the rhodesian mining in the colonial era

the rhodesian mining in the colonial era
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the rhodesian mining in the colonial era Farmers, Miners and the State in Colonial Zimbabwe Southern Rhodesia from 1895 when the Mines and Minerals Act was pro

the rhodesian mining in the colonial era

  • the rhodesian mining in the colonial era

    Farmers, Miners and the State in Colonial Zimbabwe Southern Rhodesia from 1895 when the Mines and Minerals Act was promulgated to promote the growth of the country’s mining industry The study ends in 1961 when an amendment to the colonial era, even as the postcolonial government has ostensibly tried to redress theget priceA recurring complaint, heard throughout the colonial period, was that an unacceptably high proportion of the territory's mineral wealth had been extracted, depriving Northern Rhodesia of precious funds with which it might have pursued development in its own interests 23 For critics of the financial structures found in British Africa, this was 'a particularly striking example of the "leakage(PDF) Copper Empire: Mining and the Colonial State in· It is proposed in this article to turn to colonial Zambia and to look at the very different field of mining legislation, concentrating on the middle and later period of colonial rule before and after the Second World War Compared with the early days in West Africa, bureaucratic techniques had been refined and communications greatly improved This did not always lead to speed in theThe Mining Ordinance of Northern Rhodesia: A Legislative

  • the rhodesian mining in the colonial era Mining

    · Northern Rhodesia – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Historical era: Interwar period · NorthWestern Rhodesia and NorthEastern RhodesiaThe Colonial Office acted as a distant supervisor, Northern Rhodesian copper mining »More detailedAD Roberts, ‘Notes towards a financial history of copper mining in Northern Rhodesia’, Canadian Journal of African Studies 16, 2 (1982), P Slinn, ‘Commercial concessions and politics during the colonial period: the role of the British South Africa Company in Northern Rhodesia, 1890–1964’, African Affairs 70 (1971), 371–2 Google Scholar 87 JM Lee, Colonial DevelopmentThe Colonial State and the Development of the CopperbeltFarmers, Miners and the State in Colonial Zimbabwe Southern Rhodesia from 1895 when the Mines and Minerals Act was promulgated to promote the growth of the country’s mining industry The study ends in 1961 when an amendment to the colonial era, even as the postcolonial government has ostensibly tried to redress theget pricethe rhodesian mining in the colonial era

  • (PDF) Copper Empire: Mining and the Colonial State in

    A recurring complaint, heard throughout the colonial period, was that an unacceptably high proportion of the territory's mineral wealth had been extracted, depriving Northern Rhodesia of precious funds with which it might have pursued development in its own interests 23 For critics of the financial structures found in British Africa, this was 'a particularly striking example of the "leakageMining to take off rapidly when rich ore was subsequently discovered this thesis explores how the northern rhodesian copperbelt was produced as a space for natural resource extraction in the colonial period through attention to the military, political and economic practices which produced regimes of access to, and control over, resourcesThe Rhodesian Mining In The Colonial EraIn this earlier period, dozens of mining and other commercial enterprises failed, Interventions in socioecological relations were a focus of British colonial rule in Northern Rhodesia and created the political and economic 'infrastructure' which enabled mining to take off rapidly when rich ore was subsequently discovered This thesis explores how the Northern Rhodesian Copperbelt wasAHistoryofNorthern Rhodesiapdf Unearthing Rule

  • Farmers, Miners and the State in Colonial Zimbabwe

    Southern Rhodesia from 1895 when the Mines and Minerals Act was promulgated to promote the growth of the country’s mining industry The study ends in 1961 when an amendment to this same Act was crafted after the incorporation of considerations from the country’s farmers and miners The country’s mining law, devised by the British South Africa Company (BSAC) to further its commercialAD Roberts, ‘Notes towards a financial history of copper mining in Northern Rhodesia’, Canadian Journal of African Studies 16, 2 (1982), P Slinn, ‘Commercial concessions and politics during the colonial period: the role of the British South Africa Company in Northern Rhodesia, 1890–1964’, African Affairs 70 (1971), 371–2 Google Scholar 87 JM Lee, Colonial DevelopmentThe Colonial State and the Development of theIt is proposed in this article to turn to colonial Zambia and to look at the very different field of mining legislation, concentrating on the middle and later period of colonial rule before and after the Second World War Compared with the early days in West Africa, bureaucratic techniques had been refined and communications greatly improved This did not always lead to speed in theThe Mining Ordinance of Northern Rhodesia: A Legislative

  • Unearthing Rule mining, power and the political ecology

    Interventions in socioecological relations were a focus of British colonial rule in Northern Rhodesia and created the political and economic 'infrastructure' which enabled mining to take off rapidly when rich ore was subsequently discovered This thesis explores how the Northern Rhodesian Copperbelt was produced as a space for natural resource extraction in the colonial period throughIn the early colonial period European employers in the country experienced great labour shortages and uncertainty as a result of several crucial factors One was the general unwillingness of indigenous African societies to submit to wage exploitation, as long as the rural economy provided an option In Northwestern Zimbabwe the Shangwe were able to expand their precolonial tobacco industryThe Early History of Wage Labour and Worker Consciousness· The mining industry of today has a lot to learn from precolonial Great Zimbabwe and all colonial mining prospecting has to acknowledge that it was guided by precolonial workings Disappointing is the fact that modern day Zimbabwe has dismally failed to ride on this great mining heritage It is in the early Iron Age that a new economy, driven mainly by mining, spread rapidly, fromHistory of precolonial mining in Zimbabwe |

  • Farmers, Miners and the State in Colonial Zimbabwe

    Southern Rhodesia from 1895 when the Mines and Minerals Act was promulgated to promote the growth of the country’s mining industry The study ends in 1961 when an amendment to this same Act was crafted after the incorporation of considerations from the country’s farmers and miners The country’s mining law, devised by the British South Africa Company (BSAC) to further its commercialIn this earlier period, dozens of mining and other commercial enterprises failed, Interventions in socioecological relations were a focus of British colonial rule in Northern Rhodesia and created the political and economic 'infrastructure' which enabled mining to take off rapidly when rich ore was subsequently discovered This thesis explores how the Northern Rhodesian Copperbelt wasAHistoryofNorthern Rhodesiapdf Unearthing Ruleidentified in Southern Rhodesia in this period: (1) that sector or regions specializing in production for exportfor example, mines and, increasingly, certain capitalist farms and companyowned plantations; (2) a sector supplying the exportproducing regions with food and services; and (3) a third category which consisted of 'peripheral regions which either supplied migrant labour orIN SOUTHERN RHODESIA, 18901914

  • (PDF) Seeing the Copperbelt: Science, mining and

    Seeing the Copperbelt: Science, mining and colonial power in Northern Rhodesia January 2013 ; Geoforum 44:271–281; DOI: 101016/jgeoforum201208007 Authors: Tomas Frederiksen The· rthern and southern Rhodesia, the Gold Coast and the Belgian Congo, and a significant part of those from Angola, Sierra Leone and Southwest Africa Most of the private foreign capital invested in Africa from 1870 to 1935 went into mining, and much colonial public investment was intended for developing mining South Africa received the bulk of the investment and the subsequent reinvestmentMining history: African mining on the eve of the colonialThe Copper Industry in the Colonial Period THE SETTING When the British South Africa Company (BSA) took over Northern Rhodesia in 1889, the Copperbelt was a sparsely inhabited, narrow strip of country, about 80 miles long, in the northcentral section of the country About 4,000 feet above sea level and approximately 13° south of the equator, the rocky infertile soil discouraged productive“1 The Copper Industry in the Colonial Period” in “Labor

  • Patriarchy, Capitalism, and the Colonial State in Zimbabwe

    1 I use "Southern Rhodesia" to refer to the British colonial period, "Zimbabwe" to refer to the modern nation; in this article I focus on the 18901939 period as reflecting the classic years of British colonial rule, before the Second World War and the postwar rise of African nationalism Capitalists, settlers, and missionaries in Southern Rhodesia came from a number of countries in additionIn the early years of European colonisation, mining and agriculture were the bases of the Rhodesian colonial economy and manufacturing was virtually nonexistent This study traces the origins and early development of the sector in the interwar years and its rapid growth during the second world war and the Central African Federation years It also analyses the fortunes of the manufacturingZimbabwe: A History of Manufacturing, 18901995 A S· Southern Rhodesia was established in 1923 as a British colony named for Cecil Rhodes, who made his fortune in consolidating diamond minesRhodesia’s Dead — but White Supremacists Have Given It

  • The Early History of Wage Labour and Worker Consciousness

    In the early colonial period European employers in the country experienced great labour shortages and uncertainty as a result of several crucial factors One was the general unwillingness of indigenous African societies to submit to wage exploitation, as long as the rural economy provided an option In Northwestern Zimbabwe the Shangwe were able to expand their precolonial tobacco industry